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Jury Duty Can Help You Sell More: Disqualifying Prospects

If you noticed my lack of posting last week, it’s because I was called up for jury duty.

The dread was palpable when I saw the envelope with the familiar red stripe across the top of the envelope and the bold “Jury Summons” label. In my household, it seems like I always get a jury summons every two years. Nobody else in my family ever seems to get one.

The thought of a week in a courtroom was not a pleasant one. But I know it’s my civic duty and I’ve drilled the concept into the heads of my now adult children, so sucking it up was the only answer.

The courtroom was filled with 78 potential jurors in this criminal DUI case. The process for selecting, or rather, deselecting potential jurors was arduous and repetitive. But something caught my attention about the people they let go.

While many people were granted deferments for a variety of scheduling problems, there were at least three categories of people that were outright dismissed from duty:

  • The Heavily Biased
  • The Poor Communicators
  • The Quiet Type

The heavily biased were drilled by the judge to qualify whether they truly were heavily biased or just trying to get out of the assignment. Most, who started with a claim of bias, eventually capitulated to the judge’s expert grilling and said they could weigh the evidence and reach a verdict of not guilty or guilty beyond a reasonable doubt. Only two were let go with a claim of bias, but around ten people originally claimed they were.

There were three poor communicators. One gentlemen who simply shrugged and quietly smiled at almost every question the judge asked, a trauma nurse who would take two or three whole minutes in silence while formulating her response to each question, only to spur the judge to dig in more after an incomprehensible answer, and the unfortunate guy who apparently enjoyed the 60’s a little too much. He sounded a lot like the present day Ozzy Osbourne if you know what I mean.

Although I was grateful for the dismissals of the poor communicators, and I developed an appreciation for how skilled the judge was at disqualifying bias, the quiet type dismissal caught my attention the most.  These people did not raise their hand when either the prosecutor, defense attorney or the judge asked a group question. When asked questions directly, they gave very brief answers. No elaboration whatsoever. At a high level I could discern they weren’t inarticulate. The speed of their response and vocabulary were strong indicators. They also didn’t announce any bias one way or the other, yet they were dismissed by either the prosecutor or the defense in round after round of peremptory challenge. (No reason has to be given by either party, but each side is allowed a certain number for juror dismissal.)

Then it dawned on me. They couldn’t get a gage for how that person was feeling. They were holding their cards too close to their vest, and neither side of the case wanted to take a chance on the quiet type.

So what does this have to do with sales?

The biggest productivity challenge and frustration for most professional sales people is the no decision outcome. Our research indicates the three largest contributors to a no decision outcome are:

  • Inability of the prospect to articulate or agree on the problem set.
  • Inability of the prospect to articulate or agree on the value proposition.
  • Inability or refusal to mobilize other more powerful stakeholders into the dialog.

All three of these behaviors are often masked with silence, short but nonproductive answers, redirection, or outright refusal to engage on the subject. In other words, they operate like the quiet type juror. You can’t tell what they are thinking; they keep the information to a minimum, and end up wasting your time.

The next time you’re sitting across from someone who won’t discuss their problems, can’t estimate the value of resolving the problems, and/or refuses to bring others into the conversation, remember the prosecutor that is trying to sell his case beyond a reasonable doubt. Then politely excuse yourself from the conversation and move on to someone who is better prepared to buy.

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Kevin Temple guides sales teams to be more agile and improve revenue outcomes. He can be contacted at kevin@enterprise-selling.com. The Enterprise Selling Group is a leader in delivering sales training, coaching and project oversight to improve the agility of sales teams around the world.

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