Category Archives: Sales Leadership

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The Trump Effect On Enterprise Selling

This is not a political opinion piece. I’m not commenting on policies in favor or against the new administration. I’m simply spotlighting a challenge and an opportunity in sales given the current transition in power.

The inspiration for this article came recently while listening to Jim Cramer’s show called Mad Money, where he evaluates investment opportunities and makes recommendations on buy/sell actions. The segment that caught my attention was focused on the Trump effect on Wall Street. Also a non partisan assessment of the ups and downs on Wall Street related to recent policy announcements with some insight into investment opportunities. It got me thinking about the effects of recent policy changes on sales people and sales campaigns.


The most obvious implication is for sales people who sell healthcare solutions or solutions to help companies comply with regulatory requirements. Both of these topics are front and center for the new administration which is likely to cause prospects in these categories to go into “wait and see” mode. For sales leaders in these segments, no decision outcomes are likely to increase and create havoc on forecasting and close ratios.


Secondarily are companies or industry segments that are spotlighted but have not yet experienced a policy outcome. This includes pharmaceuticals, companies with foreign manufacturing, and potentially even travel related businesses. There may be others in the weeks to come.


The point I want to make is that now is the time for sellers focused on these industries to pivot from their standard operating procedure. For example, when the dot com bubble went bust in 2002, Cisco’s sales retracted about 15%. But their closest competitors reported a 30% reduction in sales. Cisco pivoted while their competitors stayed the course. In the face of a frozen market, Cisco consciously branched out from their focus on IT and began a campaign to call on the C suite to compel investment into networking to deliver business results, not just implement updated infrastructure which was the focus of most IT purchases prior to the bust. Their pipeline from non-IT centric opportunities grew by 300% and mitigated the sales retraction that would have happened had they not pivoted. (As you may have guessed, I was consulting with Cisco on this pivoting strategy at the time.)


If you are selling into a market that might freeze like a deer in the proverbial headlights due to potential changes in policy, here are some practices you might want to sharpen:


1. Identifying the compelling reason to change. Whether your sales proposal is battling other uses for funds, or trying to unstick a frozen buyer, being meticulous in uncovering, articulating and confirming the reasons for change are of paramount importance. This means identifying the people/process/technology problems the buyer is experiencing, connecting these underlying problems to C level topics I call business issues (time to market, cost management, competitive differentiation, and more.), and calculating the cost of not taking action. The three components of a compelling business proposal are critical for overcoming the distractions of potential policy changes or mitigating the impact of an actual policy change if the business proposition is compelling. This orientation requires the seller to get out of a capabilities focused dialog and into a problem hunting, value articulation and stakeholder threading dialog.


2. Incorporate more powerful stakeholders.  As Cisco found out, the more powerful the stakeholder the less difficult it is to compel action in the face of uncertainty. Lower level stakeholders tend to get scared and withdraw during times of crisis, so they need help overcoming this natural behavior mode. An Agile seller will announce the requirement to incorporate more powerful stakeholders as a result of concerns about wasting time given policy implications, and hold the line if pressured to relent. Use the potential waste of time as a reason to bring more powerful stakeholders into the conversation.


3. Qualify, Qualify, Qualify. When markets freeze, your time allocation becomes critical. As I’ve said before, a prospect that won’t buy robs you twice. First they rob you of the time you spent with them with no results to show, and second they rob you of the time you could have spent with a different prospect that was in a better position to buy. In times of crisis, BANT (Budget, Authority, Need and Timing) is no longer a viable qualification model. The Agile seller shifts to a disqualification model. In effect they put the buyer in the position of having to convince the seller that they will buy even under unusual circumstances. In 2009, at the height of the great recession, Imprivata, a provider of single sign on solutions used this model to separate tire kicking prospects that had too much time on their hands and no money to spend from those that were willing to help Imprivata sell more effectively. Their business grew 47% during the worst year of the recession. The secret to their disqualification process? See items 1 and 2 above. Or read more here.


In a nutshell, the new administration is and will probably continue to create crisis in specific industry segments. The Agile seller will learn to use the situation to compel their contacts to collaborate more effectively given the obvious potential for wasting time. And they’ll take the opportunity to sharpen their selling skills and turn adversity into an advantage. 

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B2B Selling: Five trends from 2016 and predictions for 2017

One of the joys of our business is that each day we get to work with some of the smartest sales and business leaders on the planet. While our job is to train their sales teams, we often learn as much as we teach. With this in mind, there are a handful of themes that gained traction in 2016 and we expect will have an even greater impact on enterprise selling in 2017:

Customers are more empowered than ever. Buyers are in control and they know it. This isn’t new, but it’s accelerating at an increasing rate. The implications are more and more clear, with some enterprise sales leaders reporting that buyers are as much as 90 percent of the way through their journey before they ever talk with a sales rep. Data sheets and solutions briefs are no longer a starting point for sales conversations, and the salespeople who fail to adapt to this dynamic are simply not going to make their numbers. Sales people need to become masters at reframing the problem set to differentiate their offering in the face of often unknown competition.

CEOs will increasingly abandon incremental changes in favor of big shifts. A 2016 study by KPMG says that four out 10 CEOs expect to be running significantly transformed companies in as little as three years. Our clients tell us market, competitive, regulatory and pricing challenges are forcing them to adapt quickly. And that leaders no longer have the luxury of time to see how their strategies play out. In short: the race will be won by those who adapt and move fast.

Tech spending will slow and the fight for budget will intensify. Gartner predicts sluggish growth in IT spending through 2020. Gartner also predicts that in 2017, the CMO will spend more on IT than the CIO, yet another indication that technology spend is shifting from the IT organization to lines of business. Sales organizations will need to adapt to smaller budgets by getting stronger at justifying the need for their solution. And they will need to develop the skills to navigate across customer organizations, new buying stakeholders and budget centers.

There will be more turnover of senior executives as CEOs look to spark growth. The average tenure of a CMO in Silicon Valley is about 18 months, far less than for B2C companies. We’re betting the axe won’t be limited to marketing, with leaders in sales, IT, product development and other areas on a short leash as well. Sales professionals are used to the perform or perish model in their own careers, but will need to learn to adapt faster to a changing landscape of buyers, competitors and influencers.

New roles and functions will become the locus of power and budget in the pursuit of growth. Old titles and portfolios are giving way to a new C-suite populated with executives responsible for revenue, digital transformation, privacy and security. Old customer entry points and buying processes are likewise being replaced by new centers of power and budget, which will vary from customer to customer. Sales professionals will need to become adept at understanding and managing the new buying landscape.

And one more: sales leaders will demand even more from salespeople. It’s true, the goalposts have always moved, so why is this a prediction? We see a new urgency driven in part by the need to capitalize on recent investments in sales force automation, sales performance management, sales enablement and related technologies. Our clients are telling us they will be placing more emphasis on change management and skills development to drive more productivity and effectiveness from their teams.

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Three Suggestions For Building A Sales Funnel In The New Year

If January marks the beginning of a new fiscal year for you and your team, here are three sales leadership suggestions that can help your team get started on building a productive funnel.

1. Define a Personal Quota Now!

It seems like the larger the organization, the longer it takes to distribute new annual quotas. I’ve witnessed some organizations take three or four months to distribute official quotas. The associated sales behavior in the absence of a quota is palpable. It’s no wonder why the first quarter is typically the least productive quarter for enterprise sales teams.

My suggestion is to select an interim aggressive growth target. For example, if your company is on a 20% growth trajectory, select a 30% or 40% growth target over the prior year for each personal quota target. Then develop each individual territory plan around this interim aggressive goal; including prospecting targets, call goals and so forth. The idea is to build and execute a territory plan without waiting for the machine to catch up. Then when it does catch up, the real but comparatively lower quota that actually gets assigned will feel like a relief rather than unimaginable, and your team will already be firing on all cylinders.

2. Identify, Develop and Roll Out a Strategic Initiative to Rally the Team.

Remember the adage, “When the going gets tough, the tough get going.” The idea is to select an initiative that is smart, achievable, adds to the success of the team, and moreover, is measurable. It could be a focus on adding services to every sale, or focusing on dominating a certain competitor, or a tactical target to call on three new executives in the largest account as just a few examples. Ideally it develops a muscle that is atrophied on your team, produces a measurable success, and is achievable. Use the initiative to spur action, share information, and further develop your own leadership skills.

Here are some key topics to include in your Strategic Initiative Plan and communication:

Why: Communicate why the initiative is important, and why it’s good for the team and individual.

What: Communicate tangible, measurable goals.

How: Communicate how the goals are to be achieved. This might include the identification of new skills, training, reading a book, activities that have not been used before, or teaming suggestions.

Consequence/Reward: Don’t forget to tie the initiative to a reward and consequence. It could be a specific SPIFF or a simple lunch on you, but a payoff is critical to the measurement and achievement recognition. Conversely, the consequence should be fair in proportion to the initiative and not arbitrary.

3. Celebrate Small Victories.

With twelve months in front of you, or three if you’re really quarterly focused, a strategic initiative can lose steam very quickly in the face of everyday distractions. Good leaders celebrate the small victories on the way to success. For example, if your selected strategic initiative is to call on three unfamiliar executives in your key accounts, celebrate success when each team member achieves their first appointment. The idea is to maintain a focus, keep the team motivated, and rise above the noise of the daily din.

Kevin Temple guides sales teams to be more agile and improve revenue outcomes. He can be contacted at kevin@enterprise-selling.com. The Enterprise Selling Group is a leader in delivering sales training, coaching and project oversight to improve the agility of sales teams around the world.

 

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How To Close Every Year End Deal

It’s that time of year again. If your sales team is shifting into gear to close out the year, this article may help you optimize your outcome.

I’ll introduce two very valuable tools for managing the closing process more effectively, the Mutual Activity Plan and the Close Plan.

The Mutual Activity Plan (MAP) is a document developed with the prospect to identify the activities required to reach a decision. These activities might include meetings with other stakeholders, conducting evaluations, talking with references, proposal reviews and more. It’s organized with due dates and action owners as if it’s a project plan – because it is a project plan. Further, it’s a “map” to a destination point; placing the order.

The value of the MAP is getting the buying sponsor on board with you with a timeline. Moreover, if they fail to meet an action item, they have broken an agreement of sorts, providing you with the platform to ask, “why?”, or better, ask for something in return. If they fail to meet a commitment, I suggest asking for something in return that will help improve your chances of closing on time, such as meeting with the final decision maker, or reviewing the prospect’s internal justification document to add suggestions for example.

Here’s a simple example of a MAP:

Activity                                                                           Owner                  Due Date

Discovery meeting with all stakeholders         Smith                    11-25-15

Demo for entire team                                                Smith/Jones        12-1-15

Review with Legal                             Smith/Jones        12-7-15

Engage Purchasing                            Smith/Jones        12-14-15

Place order                                                                    Jones                   12-20-15

Given the complexity of your sale, the MAP may be short and to the point, or it may be several pages long. The longer it is, the more important it is to establish it as a tool to manage the process to a predictable outcome.

Recently, one of the sales leaders in a client site of mine reviewed the previous quarter closing results for one of his struggling sales people and found that every opportunity that closed had a MAP, whereas, the opportunities that slipped into the next quarter did not have a MAP in place. The lesson for the sales rep: it’s difficult for the prospect to meet expectations if they don’t know what they are.

The Close Plan is the MAP plus the internal activities the customer should not see, or should not be bothered with, but need to be managed to closure. These might include examples such as a credit check on the customer, approvals for special options, new product capabilities that are required, discount approval and more.

I typically see more complex close plans required for professional services or other applications where there are multiple contingencies to address, several internal approvals required, and heavily customized solutions. However, sometimes they are more complex because of the nature of the selling company’s culture or bureaucracy. Regardless, the more internal obstacles you have in the way of closing an opportunity, the more important it is to have a close plan in place to keep every required activity front and center.

Finally, having a plan in writing is good, but it also needs to be managed to success. Use the MAP or Close Plan as a review tool to help the sales person make progress on their plan. Check off items as they are achieved and identify activities with high risk to brainstorm on alternatives and contingencies.

I feel compelled to wish you luck closing out your quarter, but we both know that it comes down to great leadership and disciplined sales professionals.

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Control The Buying Process: Gives and Gets

As we roll into the holiday season, its time to think about giving… and getting.

Research by CEB indicates top performing sales people exert more control over the buying process than their colleagues. In this article I’ll share two powerful tools for exerting more control over the buying process which can result in higher win rates and shorter sales cycles.

One of the key premises for control is a healthy balance of give and get. If your buyer values you and/or your solution, they should be demonstrating this by collaborating with you when the process hits a snag. If the balance is heavily lopsided in their favor, you are most likely not their first choice.

Gives and Gets

The discipline to routinely ask for something in return is a powerful control tool when it comes to improving sales results. Consider some of the common requests potential buyers make of you:

  • Can we arrange a demo?
  • Can we install your solution on site for 30 days to evaluate it?
  • Can you provide budgetary pricing?
  • Can we see your five year roadmap?
  • Can we talk to your subject matter experts?
  • Can we talk to a reference?
  • … and more!

Each of these requests presents an opportunity to ask for something in return. I recommend asking for information or activities that will shorten the time to decision. Some examples:

  • Access to other stakeholders, especially those with the power to say yes to a decision.
  • Insight into key metrics that could shed light on the value proposition for making a change.
  • Insight into key competitors and their differentiators that might be important to address.
  • Collaboration on the internal justification document.
  • Confirmation of the current business issues demanding attention in the buyer’s C suite. (This gives you the opportunity to tie your solution to a strategic initiative.)

Keep track of the Gives and Gets outcomes to provide you with a view of the health of your relationship with your buyer. Wins usually have a balanced Give/Get ratio, losses and no decision outcomes are usually biased toward the buyer’s demands with little representation of the seller’s requests. A one sided relationship usually indicates that you are not the first choice, and you are probably being used as column fodder against another preference.

A Series of Formal Agreements

As you navigate your way through the buying/selling process, take notice of the number of informal agreements you establish along the way. For example, which stakeholders you can access, how long the evaluation will take, the decision criteria, when a decision will be made, and so forth. Each of these agreements presents an opportunity to exercise more control by formalizing the agreement in writing. I’ve seen top performers build a list of agreements into something I call the mutual action plan, however, it doesn’t have to be a signed document; it can be a simple email recap with a request to acknowledge the agreement.

The act of formalizing the agreement is valuable in itself for exerting control; however, the most powerful use of the concept comes about when your buyer breaks an agreement. This is when you have the right to ask for something in return! Think of this as a level two Give and Get.

For example, let’s assume you have documented the terms of an evaluation. But now the buyer comes to you and says, “I know we asked for 30 days to evaluate your solution, but we ran into some other distractions that got in our way. Can we extend the evaluation another 30 days to make sure we have ample time to conduct a proper evaluation?“

If you have established a more formal agreement, you should be entitled to ask for something in return. Once again, ask for something that will help you shorten your sales cycle, like access to other important stakeholders, or validation of metrics that can support the need for change.

Conversely, if you failed to document the agreement, you have less ground to stand on to ask for something in return. It doesn’t mean you can’t ask, and it doesn’t mean they won’t grant a return request, but the odds go up for granting your requests when a more formal agreement is in place.

Summary

To shorten sales cycles, reduce the number of no decisions, and set expectations for the dynamics of your relationship, consider using Gives and Gets as well as Formal Agreements to exert more control. Lastly, tracking the positive acceptance or negative denials for Give/Get requests may provide you with advance insight about the outcome of the process.

If you want to change your discipline in this area, consider mounting a poster above your computer to remind you to look for Give/Get opportunities and Formalize AgreementsHere’s an example you can modify to fit your needs.

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The Secret To Cross Selling Or Up Selling More Effectively

Almost every sales leader is familiar with this problem. Pareto’s law, otherwise known as the 80/20 rule, applies to most sales organizations. Eighty percent of their revenue comes from less than 20% of their solution portfolio. If you combine this with Forrester’s research finding it’s five times less expensive to sell to an existing customer than a new one, you will probably reach the conclusion that selling across the product line to existing customers should be a major component of any revenue growth strategy. Unfortunately, most sales teams lack the agility to execute on this skill set with consistent results. But the good news is there is a simple way to enable individuals and whole organizations to cross sell or up sell more effectively.

For simplicity, the information I’m about to share applies to both up selling and cross selling, but I’ll condense the terms into one for ease of reading.

There are two factors that dictate the agility of a sales organization when it comes to selling across the product line. First, the learning model they apply to the challenge, and second, the accountability factor.

Left to their own devices, most organizations unconsciously apply the same failed learning model for new products. They shovel facts and capabilities at the seller, load on a couple of reference logos and call it a day. (Since we’re in an election year, I thought a little hyperbole might sound familiar.) The crucial point is that capabilities focused training doesn’t promote cross selling as much as the alternative I’m going to explore.

Unfortunately, most sellers, even the brightest, hit learning saturation and can’t digest nor retain this information. Worse, this information does very little to prepare the seller to create need for the target product or differentiate in the face of competition.

A Simple Lesson In Up Selling

I was taught a lesson in up selling by a Best Buy sales person a long time ago. When I went to buy a home entertainment system, I was confused by the complex system specification lists displayed in front of each product. I had a scratch pad in hand and was furiously taking notes, trying to find the best value. A salesperson approached me and asked if I was overwhelmed by the choices. I sheepishly nodded my head in acknowledgement. He glanced down at my then five year old son standing next to me who was not hiding his lack of patience in the matter, and said, “I could ask you one question that will make this very easy to figure out”. He had my attention. He continued, “do you envision entertaining adults in one room or on the patio with some nice music while the children are kept occupied in another room with a movie or TV show? I said, “yes”. He then pointed to the system at the top of the shelf and said there was only one model that could do both. Needless to say, I went home with the most expensive system on display!

Dell Learns to Cross Sell

Years ago, I received a call from Brian Powers, the director of training for Dell Computers at the time. Brian said my name was handed to him by a Gartner representative who said I could help them with a big problem. He was calling to get my input on a cross selling challenge they were facing. At that time, Dell was in transition. They were attempting to fuel revenue growth by adding servers, storage and services to their solution line up. This was not a single new product addition; they were expanding their portfolio dramatically in the blink of an eye across three new product lines and several hundred sales people!

When I asked to see their training materials, I would describe them as glorified data sheets. They were attempting to shovel facts and specifications into the minds of their sellers, thinking this was going to get the job done.

I was not surprised to hear the initiative was not meeting expectations.

With the lesson learned from buying a home theater solution, here’s what we did to reshape Dell’s outcome. First we broke down each major product into a set of problem probing questions. These questions come from analyzing the problems that can be solved by the new product, not the capabilities themselves. For example rather than asking, “Would you like services to install a consistent operating system image on all 200 PC’s you’re buying?”, we had them alternatively define a problem set first. “Does your support team run into problems when the operating system installs are not consistent across the organization?” This creates the need for the solution by focusing on a problem rather than the solution itself. It also lowers defenses. Its much easier for a buyer to acknowledge a problem than analyze a complex or expensive addition to their purchase.

As humans have evolved, we’ve developed pattern recognition for identifying problems, not solutions. We learned to identify a number of predators, feel discomfort with extreme temperature change, or stop at the edge of a cliff with very little coaching. The answers to addressing each of these problems took much longer to learn, pass on, or execute with consistency. From a learning perspective, problem identification is a more productive learning model than solution definition. This applies to sales as well. As exemplified by my stereo example, the seller only had to remember one problem definition to make the sale, versus digesting hundreds of specifications for comparison.

But learning isn’t the only obstacle. Accountability is as well.

Customers don’t typically demand the secondary products in a seller’s portfolio. Worse, if a seller spends time on a new product and gets beat by a competitor, they shy away from a similar time investment to insure they spend time on the in demand products.

In order to apply some level of accountability to cross selling, some teams stratify the quota by product line. Some incentivize with SPIFF’s. While others simply set expectations, measure, provide feedback and reward in other, non-financial ways. The success of any accountability strategy is highly dependent on the culture of the organization and leadership bench strength. Dell’s approach was the latter of the three. They maintained visible scoreboards, and publicly acknowledged the success of the early adopters.

In any case, the learning model needs to be supported by an effective accountability model that compels application and rewards outcomes.

Within 30 days, Dell was able to track a 26% increase in their “attach” metric, an indicator of multiple products being sold in each transaction. This fueled their new product sales which grew to become a $15 Billion annual revenue contributor to their business. This is a prime example of a large organization learning to become agile again.

How well does your team sell across the product line? Do they need to improve their cross selling or up selling agility in order to continue reaching revenue growth expectations?

Kevin Temple helps sales teams optimize their behavior and improve revenue outcomes. The Enterprise Selling Group is a leader in delivering training, coaching and project oversight to improve the agility of sales teams around the world.

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The Number One Challenge For All Sales People: Access to Power

One of the most frequent complaints I hear from sales people is the frustration of being held at arm’s length from the actual decision maker. In the course of my sales effectiveness consulting career, I have helped countless sales people overcome this challenge on a consistent basis, and many of my client companies have gone on to establish executive access as a cultural norm and competitive advantage. Access to power is a sales agility challenge. It takes an effort to tailor a message that will resonate with the power person, and motivate the sponsor to take you there.

Let’s break this challenge down into one simple concept. You will be taken to the person you sound like. If you sound like a technical person, you will be sent to the technical evaluator. If you sound like a VP, you will eventually be taken to the VP. If you sound like a CFO, your request to meet the CFO will be earnestly considered.

Your messaging should be crafted to interest the person you want to access. If you unconsciously repeat your sales messaging without crafting it, you will find yourself stuck at the same level of every organization you approach, usually an evaluator level.

Crafting a message sounds easy right? Unfortunately, most people get into a habit, and are not self-aware of their own behaviors. Let’s test our self-awareness and our agility in crafting a tailored message.

Here’s a simple test: Take a pen or pencil and jot down the most critical business issue facing your top prospect.

If you don’t know it, and can acknowledge you don’t know it, that’s the first step in self-awareness. Go to their website and look at their recent press announcements. Look for business problems. Next, go to your favorite search engine, type in their company name with an added word like “problem”, “issues”, or “challenges”. See what pops up. Then look at their operating statement. Are they any numbers that are worse than they were the year before? Do any of their numbers look worse than their closest competitor? Going through this five minute exercise will usually give you a better understanding of their business issues, help you find at least one identified business issue you can contribute to, and will prepare you to craft a compelling message that attracts more powerful stakeholders.

If you think you know the business issue, and the answer has any of your solution description in it, you’ve shot yourself in the foot. Nine times out of ten, when I ask a seller to describe the business issues’ facing a prospect, their answer is a solution request, “They need our XYZ product…” or, “They’re not happy with the competitive solution and want to evaluate ours.” In either case, the seller is seller focused, not customer focused. Until they become self-aware of this orientation, they cannot craft messaging that will attract decision makers.

Let’s assume you found the most current business issues facing a company. Now write down the top three to five problems they have addressing this business issue. The unaware seller will usually describe the situation with answers that don’t specify problems, such as, “They have 50 offices.” or “their existing solution is out of date.” These answers might insinuate a problem, but they don’t explicitly disclose a problem. They need to articulate the problems more succinctly, such as, “They have so many offices, management can’t scale to cover them all effectively.” Or, “Their existing solution caps out at 50 users, and they have several hundred requiring access at the same time.” Most executive buyers don’t have the time or the first hand usage experience to be able to connect situational information to a problem that is impeding the resolution of their business issues. An agile seller is specific in the problem diagnosis.

Lastly, describe the business issue in terms of impact. Most sellers want to describe the quantified benefit of their solution through the eyes of other customers. “Research shows our customers’ produce 15% more widgets than their competition.” While this is a valuable proof statement, validating your success, it does not equate to their value proposition. Instead, quantify and confirm their business issue from their perspective. “From what you’ve told me, your cost of sales are 18% higher than your competition, creating a $75 million profit problem. Who would be interested in solving this issue?”

When you can string these three topics together, you’ll find doors opening to more influential stakeholders. Contrast Seller A and Seller B below:

Seller A: “We have the most advanced framework providing a highly scalable solution, used by 450 of the Fortune 500. Can I schedule some time on your calendar to discuss this in more detail?”

Seller B: “I noticed your new product revenue is down 22% over last year, complicated by a lack of skilled talent, longer development cycles, and the currency crisis in Europe. Who in your organization would be interested to hear how we can address these problems?”

Seller B has crafted a tailored message that is customer focused and does not rely on a solution description. They have a much higher chance of being taken to more stakeholders than Seller A.

Access to power is an agility challenge that requires self-awareness, some research, and an effort to deliver a message that fits the customer’s issues and problems. Falling into the pattern of talking about your product without the context of the customer’s parameters, will box you into an evaluator level dialog.

The good news is that every organization can learn to create a tailored messages and gain access to decision makers!

Kevin Temple helps sales teams optimize their behavior and improve revenue outcomes. The Enterprise Selling Group is a leader in delivering training, coaching and project oversight to improve the agility of sales teams around the world.

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Bad Sales Presentation vs Great Sales Presentation

It was an unusual trip to Japan. I began the trip from San Francisco with a valid passport, only to find when I landed that it had expired as I crossed the international date line – even after two airline employees checked it! As a result, I had the privilege to spend the next four tedious hours with an immigration official. After a collaboration with an airline representative, I was eventually allowed to continue my business trip as long as my first stop was to the US Embassy for a new passport.

I didn’t get to my hotel bed until 2:00 am.

The next morning I was standing bleary eyed in front of the head of all electronic development for Toshiba Semiconductor. I pulled out my binder of about two hundred overhead transparencies (yes, it was a long time ago), and his eyes grew three or four times their size. “You’re not going to go through all of those slides, are you?” he asked while glancing at his watch. 

I smiled and let out a small chuckle. “No”, I replied, “That’s the marketing material. I only have four slides for you.”

He visibly relaxed a little, sat back in his chair, and said in perfect English, “This I have to see.” turning his head slightly up and away in apparent disbelief.

After I spent about 20 minutes on my four slides, he spent the following hour peppering me with questions, which prompted me to pull out ten to fifteen additional slides from the marketing deck. At the end of our meeting he declared that I was a presentation samurai, and demanded that we have dinner that night. That’s when I was introduced to a custom where the person on your right keeps your drink filled to the top for the entire dinner. Lucky for me, my flight wasn’t until four pm the next day.

After consulting with over 80 technology companies, I find the pattern is pretty standard. The typical marketing deck for sales has a predictable pattern (with minor variations):

  • We, We! (All over ourselves) This section talks about the history of the vendor’s company, their size, their locations, their market dominance or enviable spot on a Gartner Quadrant, and usually includes a customer logo slide for good measure. It’s all about the vendor. (I realize this is for credibility building, but its premature. The customer doesn’t care who you are until they conclude that you might be able to help them.)
  • More We’ing. Now they move into their product(s) overview. Lots of acronyms, complex slides, and pseudo framework pictographs intended to make it look like their products all work together. (Unfortunately, the problem is rarely defined, so the customer either can’t figure out if they need your solution or how you are different from the last vendor with a similar set of complex solution slides.)
  • Case Studies and Testimonials. Ranging from name dropping to detailed technical case studies, they are usually missing some variation of the most important details like the customer problem set, the impact on their business, and the result. 

In contrast, here’s what I did for my new found friend at Toshiba:

  • The Situation. I described a change in the macro situation that should interest them. In this case, there was a dramatic industry wide shift in the size of silicon inter-connects (the actual connection between devices on a silicon chip), going from microns down to nanometers. (A 1000 to one ratio) 
  • The Problem. Next I explored the problems the situation created for design teams like Toshiba. Everything they knew about circuit design and troubleshooting had just been disrupted. The inter-connects would now act like someone peppered millions of new devices into their design, causing fluctuations in performance outside of specification, leading to head scratching, trial and error problem solving on a massive scale across a chip that could have millions of inter-connects.
  • The Impact. Plain and simple, I talked about the competitive disadvantages if they didn’t make the shift, followed by how the new situation would impact design schedules, time to market, feature trade offs, and other relevant business issues. 
  • The Success of Others Just Like Them. This is where I share a story or two about other companies that Toshiba could relate to, and how we helped them overcome the same challenges. (Yes, this is the case study or reference story, but it comes after the situation, problem, and impact development, and reiterates the situation/problem/impact framework for the case study company.)

In my first twenty minutes with Toshiba, I didn’t talk about our company or our products. I talked about the problems Toshiba will be experiencing and how they would impact their business results.

The following hour I did answer questions about our products, how they worked together, how many support people we had in Japan, and lots of other details that were already available in the standard marketing deck. But in this case, the audience was primed to want the information.

I suggest you conduct a quick inspection. Pull out the most recent deck you’ve used in a customer presentation, or if you’re a sales leader, ask one of your sales people for one. Most important on the list for retooling, check to see if the situation/problem was defined by slide three or four (at the most). If not, simply add a situation/problem definition slide followed by an impact slide and you will have upped the horsepower on the compelling aspect of your presentation by 100%.

Kevin Temple guides sales teams to be more agile and improve revenue outcomes. He can be contacted at kevin@enterprise-selling.com. The Enterprise Selling Group is a leader in delivering sales training, coaching and project oversight to improve the agility of sales teams around the world.

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Forecasting Accuracy: How to Clear the Fog

In the 1966 film Blow-Up, a London fashion photographer named Thomas unknowingly documents a murder. At first, Thomas doesn’t notice the crime hidden in his photograph. The blurred background accentuated by shadows and foliage make the scene invisible. After he repeatedly blows up the image, zooming in over and over again on what seems to be a minor feature, is the disturbing truth revealed: a terrible crime has been committed and the photograph has made Thomas a witness. The most important thing in the photo had been concealed in the background all along.

I mention this movie because it reminds me of forecasting. Many times the reason for buying or not buying a solution are in plain site, but hidden by the shadows of other priorities. 

One of my client companies sells software to aid in the development of software. They had asked me to analyze a set of loss and no decision outcomes to understand if there were any trends they could get an upper hand on. I first interviewed the sales teams, then I reached out to the buyers for each opportunity. In one particular case, the sales person classified the no decision outcome as a lack of budget. When I talked to the buyer, he told me that the company was growing so fast, and hiring so quickly, they ran out of parking space. It turns out the CEO redirected any excess funds to build a parking garage, pushing many other purchases on to the back burner for sponsor and seller alike.

In this case, the hidden “crime” was actually in plain site. However, to reveal it, the seller needed to ask a few more questions. When I was a young sales person working for a technology software company, I had the pleasure to take Rick, our Senior VP of Worldwide Sales on several high level relationship building meetings with my most important clients. I noticed in every meeting Rick started each conversation by asking about the client’s business… “how’s business?” he would ask, or “I read about the recent acquisitions your company has executed, how are those working out?”, on occasion, being even more direct, “I understand your CEO has announced company wide cost cutting initiatives, how’s that affecting your team?” 

My reaction to his questions varied from wondering why he would ask a senior technical leader about business, to kicking myself for missing the elephant in the room when he had obviously done his homework better than I did. 

After one particularly hair raising insight gained from one of his broad, “how’s business going” questions (my client revealed a merger pending with one of our other customers who had a much better pricing arrangement with us), I began to appreciate the value of his line of questions. He was purposely trying to uncover the priorities of the client both hidden and in plain view. In most cases, the answers provided gave me better insight into the forecast likelihood of the opportunity, both good and bad.

The current business issues of your customers will dictate their buying behavior. When the sponsor goes to the funder for sign-off, the current business issues that have his or her attention will influence their desire to fund or not fund a purchase request. For instance, cost cutting initiatives will put most purchases on hold, while prioritizing purchases that can save additional costs in other areas. A recent merger announcement can also put purchases on hold until the dust settles. Other business issues like changing competitive landscapes,  or changes in federal regulation could be positive for many selling situations. Rick taught me to evaluate my selling opportunity against the current business issues of my prospect to get a better insight on the forecast likelihood of every opportunity.

Kevin Temple guides sales teams to be more agile and improve revenue outcomes. He can be contacted at kevin@enterprise-selling.com. The Enterprise Selling Group is a leader in delivering sales training, coaching and project oversight to improve the agility of sales teams around the world.

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What Clint Eastwood Would Say About Selling

Remember the movie “The Gauntlet” with Clint Eastwood? He’s been ordered to pick up a prisoner and deliver her to the courthouse a few hundred miles away. What he doesn’t know at the time is that he was selected to fail. As the plot progresses, it seems like everyone is out to kill him. The conspiracy runs right up to and includes the police commissioner.

The same goes for sales reps that are chartered to sell consultatively, or in current vernacular, as a challenger. It’s almost as if everyone is against them as well. From the moment they finish their introduction to a consultative selling model, it’s as if the world is against them.

Imagine this scenario that plays out every day all around the world. A successful sales person has just completed the world’s best consultative sales training workshop and they are anxious to engage their first prospect to practice their newly acquired knowledge.

The first obstacle they encounter is the customer. The first words out of the contact’s mouth are usually something to the effect of, “so what does your product do?” If a seller is particularly tenacious and holds her ground by asking to understand more about the customer’s business, it’s not uncommon to hear the prospect elevate the defense by stating, “you don’t need to know that, just tell me what your product does”. We used to call these prospects “See-Mores”, as in “let me see more”. A very seasoned consultative seller can navigate past a See-more, but the new consultative seller will need some help and guidance, especially if they run into multiple See-more’s.

Let’s talk about the second obstacle. Clint’s character, Ben Shockley, was chosen for this job because his lone wolf behaviors had produced many failures in his career. Like Ben, many sales people can be their own worst enemy. When their product expertise is the primary source of their value to a prospect, their strength becomes their weakness. At the first sign of a difficult consultative dialog, many reps will readily fall back to educating on product capabilities. Worse, when the prospect provides positive feedback for an deep dive on the product capabilities, the sales rep internalizes it as good behavior. Nothing could be further from the truth. Focusing on the product keeps access to other stakeholders to a low level, and hands over the only thing the prospect values too early in the process.

Now let’s go to the wolf in sheep’s clothing: the sales manager. Unfortunately, this person was usually given a battlefield promotion for selling more product than the next rep, but that doesn’t often translate to possessing consultative selling skills. They are often ill equipped to role model the expected behavior and are equally inclined to forego more extensive diagnostic dialogs under the pressure of a looming quarter end. Many are also not prepared or developed to coach effectively. They tend to fall back on “watch how I do it”, only to role model the best product centric habits. While it seems intuitive that the sales manager plays the most critical role in transforming a product centric seller to a consultative centric seller, they are a leading reason many sales reps’s fall back to previous behaviors.

Now the invisible enemy; consider the company that is expecting the seller to suddenly begin consultatively selling and reap the rewards of larger orders in shorter time periods with greater forecast accuracy. Unfortunately, their marketing messaging is still touting product capabilities, their recognition and reward systems still incentivizes old behaviors, their leadership hasn’t defined success in a very tangible way or probably didn’t attend the same training experience, and their solution training is still product centric. Imagine moving to a foreign country to learn a new language, but everyone speaks nothing but your primary language. You’re not likely to learn very much.

The transformation of a single sales person to sell consultatively includes many enemies, most of which are unconscious about undermining success. The transformation of an entire sales organization only magnifies the problem.

So how did Clint finally deliver on his promise? He had help. You may remember that his former partner helped him with information and coaching. For a sales team to succeed with this task, they need help as well. They need help from their manager, from their company, and from their customers. Further, each of these players needs help. The company needs to become aware of how their processes and ecosystem support old behaviors, not new ones. The manager needs to be developed to be a better coach and role model. And the customer needs to understand why engaging in a different dialog is in their best interest. Lastly, the rep needs to know about these traps in their quest so they can more effectively navigate the challenge.

Kevin Temple guides sales teams to be more agile and improve revenue outcomes. He can be contacted at kevin@enterprise-selling.com. The Enterprise Selling Group is a leader in delivering sales training, coaching and project oversight to improve the agility of sales teams around the world.